Greener Journal of Epidemiology and Public Health

Open Access

Greener Journal of Epidemiology and Public Health, Vol. 5 (5), pp. 037-043, September 2017.

 ISSN: 2354-2381 © 2017 Greener Journals

Research Article

Manuscript Number: 080817103


(DOI: http://doi.org/10.15580/GJEPH.2017.5.080817103)

 

Prevalence of Malaria and Typhoid Co-Infections among Patients who Attended State Specialist Hospital Gombe from May to August 2015 for Malaria and Widal Tests

 

1Igwe Mike, *2Lynn Maori, 3Attahiru Adamu, 

4Seth Gushit Longshit, 5Maryam Garba, 6Florence Sado and 7Abdullfattah Nurein Shittu

 

1Gombe State College of Health Science and Technology, Kaltungo, Gombe State.

2Microbiology Department, Infectious Diseases Hospital Zambuk, Gombe State.

3Microbiology Department, College of Nursing and Midwifery, Gombe State, Nigeria.

4School of Nursing Plateau State,

5Microbiology Department, State Specialist Hospital Gombe.

6Microbiology Department, State Specialist Hospital Gombe.

7M272T Masallachin Jos, Plateau State.


Abstract


Malaria and Typhoid fever are two of the leading febrile illness common in sub-Saharan Africa and remain the disease of major public health importance in causing morbidity and mortality especially in countries where poor sanitary habit, poverty and ignorance exist. This study carried out among 627 patients diagnosed for malaria (MP) and Widal test (Typhoid fever) in Gombe State Specialist Hospital (GSSH) between May – August, 2015, shows that the prevalence rate of malaria and typhoid fever co-infection is very high. 136 patients (21.7%) of the study population were discovered to have co-infection, showing a high prevalence rate when compared with the report of Agwu, E. et al (2008) who reported overall co-infection of 5.0% in Ekwulimili in Anambra state.  Of the 136 examined, 60.3% are male while 39.7% are female. The study also shows that the prevalence rate of malaria in the study area is higher in male than in female. Male had 60.0% while female had 59.1% confirming the report of Njoku, O. O. et al, 2003 who reported the rate of 76% for male and 62% for female in Azia and Umudioka communities in Anambra state. 196 (52.3%) male reacted positive for typhoid while female is 129 (51.1%). This is in contrast to the work of Onyido, A. E. et al, 2014 who reported 18.2% male and 81.8% females in Ekwulimili community in Anambra state. These observations can be attributed to wrong perceptions about the causes of malaria and typhoid fever in the study area.

 

KEY WORDS: Febrile, Morbidity, Mortality, Prevalence and Co-infection.


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