Greener Journal of Medical Sciences

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Impact Calculation



Ibrahim et al

Greener Journal of  Medical Sciences Vol.3 (1), pp. 001-007, January 2013

 ISSN: 2276-7797 © 2011 Greener Journals

Research Paper


Manuscript Number: 011313380

 

The Concept of Birth Preparedness in the Niger Delta of Nigeria

 

1*Ibrahim Isa Ayuba, 2owoeye Gani I.O. and3Wagbatsoma V.

 

1*Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, College of Health Sciences, Niger Delta University,    Amassoma, Bayelsa State, Nigeria

2Department of community medicine, College of Health Sciences, Niger Delta University,    Amassoma, Bayelsa State, Nigeria

3Department of community medicine, University of Benin, Edo State, Nigeria

 

1*Corresponding Author’s E-mail: isa.ibrahim680@ gmail. com, Tel: +234 07031819695

Abstract:

Majority of maternal deaths occur during labour and delivery, mostly as a result of delays; in recognizing danger signs, in deciding to seek care , in reaching the health facility, hence birth-preparedness which encourages preparation and decision making before labour reduces all levels of delay and promotes skilled care during labour and delivery. This study aims to determine the level of birth preparedness and the factors associated with it. This cross-sectional, multicentre descriptive study was conducted in Benin Central Hospital and University of Benin Teaching Hospital Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria. Data were collected with the aid of an interviewer -administered structured Questionnaires. 38% of the respondents revealed some level of awareness of birth preparedness however, there was a statistically significant difference in the source of information, level of education and the expression of danger signs (all p value <0.005) among these group of women. Most (40.4%) embraced birth preparedness because it allows for ease of delivery, child spacing (28.1%) and to avoid complications (23.7%). majority of respondents in UBTH plan to achieve these goals by savings (92.1%), which is statistically different from those respondents from CHB (z =3.59; p = 0.000).

Keywords: birth plan, awareness, factors, Niger delta.

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