Effects of supplementation of lactating Desert Goats with kuk (Acacia sieberiana) and Kadad (Dichrostacys cinerea) pods on Milk Production and quality

This study was conducted in Kadam village in West Kordofan State, Sudan with the aim of investigating the effect of supplementation of Desert goats on natural grazing with Kuk (Acacia sieberana) and Kadad (Dichrostacys cinerea) pods on milk production and quality. Twenty-four lactating goats in different age were divided into four similar groups, each with six animals. The groups were fed on four diets I, II, III, and IV. Group I was fed a diet of 50% Kadad pods, 25% groundnut cake, 24% sorghum grains and 1% salt. Group II was given a ration that contained 25% kadad pods, 25% kuk, 24%, sorghum grains and 25%, groundnut cake and 1% salt. Group III was fed with a ration consisting of 50% kuk pods, 0% kadad pods, 24% sorghum grain, 25% groundnut cake and 1% salt. The last group of goats (IV) depended on natural pasture alone. The supplements were offered at a rate of 750 g per head per day, and the natural pasture was supplied ad libitum. Daily milk production was recorded from the start of the experiment until the end of the lactation season that was observed for two years. Data were analyzed using for analysis of variance (ANOVA). The results showed significant differences (P <0.05) in the daily production of milk between the four groups in two seasons. Group (I) recorded the highest daily production of milk during the lactation period in two seasons, with the average daily milk production in the first season. The second season (425.8 and 492 ml / day), followed by group (415) (II and 428 ml / day), respectively, while the third group recorded (363.0 III and 411.0 ml / day), respectively. No statistically significant differences (P>0.05) were observed between the three groups for which the kadad and kuk were presented. The last group (IV) was significantly lower in daily milk production during the two seasons, and the milk yield was 282.3 and 251.3 ml / day, respectively. The results did not also showed significant differences (P <0.05) in the total milk production among the three groups, while the fourth group had the lowest milk production than groups I, II and III. The study concluded that the use of Kuk and Kadad pods in rations resulted in an increase in milk production of dairy goats during the milk season. It is recommended that more research be conducted in the field of using tree pods in feeding various types of animals raised on natural pastures. Read more
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Effects of supplementation of lactating Desert Goats with kuk (Acacia sieberiana) and Kadad (Dichrostacys cinerea) pods on Milk Production and quality

This study was conducted in Kadam village in West Kordofan State, Sudan with the aim of investigating the effect of supplementation of Desert goats on natural grazing with Kuk (Acacia sieberana) and Kadad (Dichrostacys cinerea) pods on milk production and quality. Twenty-four lactating goats in different age were divided into four similar groups, each with six animals. The groups were fed on four diets I, II, III, and IV. Group I was fed a diet of 50% Kadad pods, 25% groundnut cake, 24% sorghum grains and 1% salt. Group II was given a ration that contained 25% kadad pods, 25% kuk, 24%, sorghum grains and 25%, groundnut cake and 1% salt. Group III was fed with a ration consisting of 50% kuk pods, 0% kadad pods, 24% sorghum grain, 25% groundnut cake and 1% salt. The last group of goats (IV) depended on natural pasture alone. The supplements were offered at a rate of 750 g per head per day, and the natural pasture was supplied ad libitum. Daily milk production was recorded from the start of the experiment until the end of the lactation season that was observed for two years. Data were analyzed using for analysis of variance (ANOVA). The results showed significant differences (P <0.05) in the daily production of milk between the four groups in two seasons. Group (I) recorded the highest daily production of milk during the lactation period in two seasons, with the average daily milk production in the first season. The second season (425.8 and 492 ml / day), followed by group (415) (II and 428 ml / day), respectively, while the third group recorded (363.0 III and 411.0 ml / day), respectively. No statistically significant differences (P>0.05) were observed between the three groups for which the kadad and kuk were presented. The last group (IV) was significantly lower in daily milk production during the two seasons, and the milk yield was 282.3 and 251.3 ml / day, respectively. The results did not also showed significant differences (P <0.05) in the total milk production among the three groups, while the fourth group had the lowest milk production than groups I, II and III. The study concluded that the use of Kuk and Kadad pods in rations resulted in an increase in milk production of dairy goats during the milk season. It is recommended that more research be conducted in the field of using tree pods in feeding various types of animals raised on natural pastures. Read more
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Effects of supplementation of lactating Desert Goats with kuk (Acacia sieberiana) and Kadad (Dichrostacys cinerea) pods on Milk Production and quality

This study was conducted in Kadam village in West Kordofan State, Sudan with the aim of investigating the effect of supplementation of Desert goats on natural grazing with Kuk (Acacia sieberana) and Kadad (Dichrostacys cinerea) pods on milk production and quality. Twenty-four lactating goats in different age were divided into four similar groups, each with six animals. The groups were fed on four diets I, II, III, and IV. Group I was fed a diet of 50% Kadad pods, 25% groundnut cake, 24% sorghum grains and 1% salt. Group II was given a ration that contained 25% kadad pods, 25% kuk, 24%, sorghum grains and 25%, groundnut cake and 1% salt. Group III was fed with a ration consisting of 50% kuk pods, 0% kadad pods, 24% sorghum grain, 25% groundnut cake and 1% salt. The last group of goats (IV) depended on natural pasture alone. The supplements were offered at a rate of 750 g per head per day, and the natural pasture was supplied ad libitum. Daily milk production was recorded from the start of the experiment until the end of the lactation season that was observed for two years. Data were analyzed using for analysis of variance (ANOVA). The results showed significant differences (P <0.05) in the daily production of milk between the four groups in two seasons. Group (I) recorded the highest daily production of milk during the lactation period in two seasons, with the average daily milk production in the first season. The second season (425.8 and 492 ml / day), followed by group (415) (II and 428 ml / day), respectively, while the third group recorded (363.0 III and 411.0 ml / day), respectively. No statistically significant differences (P>0.05) were observed between the three groups for which the kadad and kuk were presented. The last group (IV) was significantly lower in daily milk production during the two seasons, and the milk yield was 282.3 and 251.3 ml / day, respectively. The results did not also showed significant differences (P <0.05) in the total milk production among the three groups, while the fourth group had the lowest milk production than groups I, II and III. The study concluded that the use of Kuk and Kadad pods in rations resulted in an increase in milk production of dairy goats during the milk season. It is recommended that more research be conducted in the field of using tree pods in feeding various types of animals raised on natural pastures. Read more
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Effects of supplementation of lactating Desert Goats with kuk (Acacia sieberiana) and Kadad (Dichrostacys cinerea) pods on Milk Production and quality

This study was conducted in Kadam village in West Kordofan State, Sudan with the aim of investigating the effect of supplementation of Desert goats on natural grazing with Kuk (Acacia sieberana) and Kadad (Dichrostacys cinerea) pods on milk production and quality. Twenty-four lactating goats in different age were divided into four similar groups, each with six animals. The groups were fed on four diets I, II, III, and IV. Group I was fed a diet of 50% Kadad pods, 25% groundnut cake, 24% sorghum grains and 1% salt. Group II was given a ration that contained 25% kadad pods, 25% kuk, 24%, sorghum grains and 25%, groundnut cake and 1% salt. Group III was fed with a ration consisting of 50% kuk pods, 0% kadad pods, 24% sorghum grain, 25% groundnut cake and 1% salt. The last group of goats (IV) depended on natural pasture alone. The supplements were offered at a rate of 750 g per head per day, and the natural pasture was supplied ad libitum. Daily milk production was recorded from the start of the experiment until the end of the lactation season that was observed for two years. Data were analyzed using for analysis of variance (ANOVA). The results showed significant differences (P <0.05) in the daily production of milk between the four groups in two seasons. Group (I) recorded the highest daily production of milk during the lactation period in two seasons, with the average daily milk production in the first season. The second season (425.8 and 492 ml / day), followed by group (415) (II and 428 ml / day), respectively, while the third group recorded (363.0 III and 411.0 ml / day), respectively. No statistically significant differences (P>0.05) were observed between the three groups for which the kadad and kuk were presented. The last group (IV) was significantly lower in daily milk production during the two seasons, and the milk yield was 282.3 and 251.3 ml / day, respectively. The results did not also showed significant differences (P <0.05) in the total milk production among the three groups, while the fourth group had the lowest milk production than groups I, II and III. The study concluded that the use of Kuk and Kadad pods in rations resulted in an increase in milk production of dairy goats during the milk season. It is recommended that more research be conducted in the field of using tree pods in feeding various types of animals raised on natural pastures. Read more
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