Perception of potato growers regarding plant clinic in Okara District, Punjab, Pakistan.

Advertisements

Article Views Count

 2,171 total views,  3 views today

Greener Journal of Agricultural Sciences

Vol. 11(4), pp. 222-227, 2021

ISSN: 2276-7770

Copyright ©2021, the copyright of this article is retained by the author(s)

https://gjournals.org/GJAS

Description: Description: Description: Description: C:\Users\user\Pictures\Journal Logos\GJAS Logo.jpg

Perception of potato growers regarding plant clinic in Okara District, Punjab, Pakistan.

1Asif Waheed, 1Muhammad Usman Hameed, 2Muhammad Haroon Majeed, 2Zain Ul Abdin, 2Muhammad Usama and 1Hafiz Ali Raza

1Institute of Agriculture Extension, Education and Rural Development, University of Agriculture Faisalabad, Punjab, Pakistan.

2Institute of Horticultural Sciences, University of Agriculture Faisalabad, Punjab, Pakistan.

ARTICLE INFO ABSTRACT
Article No.: 110821117

Type: Research

Full Text: HTML, EPUB

Potato is a well-known vegetable grown in Pakistan and it provides essential nutrients to the human body. The purpose of the study was to assess the perception of potato growers regarding plant clinics. Data were collected randomly from 120 potato growers of District Okara, Punjab, Pakistan. The findings indicated that the majority of the growers had >35-45 years old. Results indicates that 26.7 percent sampled farmers were illiterate, 23.3 percent of the respondents had up to middle level education and 30 percent of the farmers were matriculated. Whereas 40% of the potato farmers were smallholders with an average landholding of 6 to 12.5 acres. Results indicated (58.3 %) of the respondents stated that they used quality seed of potato and 55.8% stated that after the impact of plant clinic on potato productivity they will make improvement in crop varieties.There is a dire need to take some effective steps to improve plant clinics activities for increasing potato production at national level.
Accepted: 13/11/2021

Published: 28/11/2021

*Corresponding Author

Hafiz Ali Raza

E-mail: razaa0617@ gmail.com

Keywords: Perception, potato growers, plant clinic, recommended practices, adoption
   

INTRODUCTION

Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is a well-known vegetable grown all over the world. It is regarded as a valuable supply of nutrients because it provides nearly all necessary nutrients needed for the human body ranging from macronutrients that are considered as a high level of energy to micronutrients like minerals and vitamins. It is considered as 5th largely produced cultivated food commodity just after sugarcane, maize, rice, and wheat in the world (FAO, 2012). In Pakistan, potato ranks 6th among quantity-wise production of any crop (Govt. of Pakistan, 2017).

Potato producers in Pakistan are facing a continued downward trend in potato commodity prices. This is due to some problems like no value addition, no proper system, lack of modern knowledge, higher input costs and low output returns and climate change. It is being warned that climate change tends to severely threaten the agriculture sector in the future (MOE, 2009). The services provided by the public extension sector in mounting countries likewise Pakistan purpose to elaborate crop production as well as a managerial concern (Shah et al., 2010). With the help of the agricultural extension, capacity building of small farmers could be improved by need-oriented teaching (Zhou, 2010). Therefore, the services of extension, not only affect to development of their field and provide a cropping model but also motivate them to apply agricultral practices and implement of the current practices concerning their socio-economic conditions (Khatam, 2011; Khurshid., 2015). Despite a number of extension and rural development programmers being started in the region to mitigate the potao production threats, however, the sector has not seen significant growth. Because of internal departmental competition and political wavering, most programmers have failed; these are the most prominent factors (Saima et al, 2005). No doubt all the programmers initiated by the Pakistani government were unable to yield fruitful results that had been anticipated in the past. The government of Pakistan, with the cooperation of Agricultural Extension, is working on various projects to develop agriculture, and make positive decisions for the future. Now a day agricultural extension adopted the latest approach to plant clinic (plant-wise). Almost more than 500 plant clinics have been built in Pakistan. In the province of Punjab, plant clinics operate regularly in districts of Sheikhupura, Gujranwala and Bahawalpur are using with the same plant-wise strategy . The plant clinic is jointly run by Agriculture Officers and Field Assistants. In Pakistan, a data management program is working successfully to help plant clinic doctors for better diagnosis and quality advice. Upgrade this program, medications that are recommended to be registered to plant clinics, monitored for potential emerging pests, diseases, farmers need and certainly also to provide the best advice. Although the agriculture sector is considered the backbone for Pakistan’s economy it is still low yield crops compared to international yield rates. Several other factors also make agriculture vulnerable from low productivity and which emphasize upon sustainability perspective, formulation of farmers’ pleasant agricultural policies and the development of appropriate production technology (Govt. of Pak., 2010). The government of Pakistan, with the cooperation of Agricultural Extension, is working on various projects such as plant clinic to develop agriculture, and make positive decisions for the future.

Plant clinics are linked to a plant-wise knowledge bank, a portal for getting practical information on plant health online and offline, including diagnostic tools, advice on best practice pest control and even plant clinic data analysis for needed crop protection. They are both plant-wise approach tools intended to help the national plant health program. Stronger the country’s plant health program will be encourage supporting farmers and providing secure, continuous food supply and improving their livelihoods.

The available literature has been investigated carefully and no such study has been found, and it is stated that establishment of monitoring and evaluation system at district level is a national challenge for Pakistan to improved local level performance (Plant-wise Annual Report, 2016). So, that the current study was designed to evaluate plant clinics (plant-wise) in Tehsil Depalpur, District Okara.

The main objective of the study was to assess the perception of the poatao growers about familiarity with plant clinics.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Research area

The name Okara is derived from Okaan, the name of a type of tree. It is the 25th largest city of Pakistan by population. The city is located Southwest of the city of Lahore and Faisalabad was 100 km by passing away Ravi River. It is known for its agriculture-based economy and cotton mills. The nearest major city to Okara is Sahiwal, formerly known as Montgomery. Pakistan military dairy farms, known for their cheese, are situated in Okara. Pul Dhool near Abdulla Sugar Mill is town in district Okara. Pul Dhool is on Hujra Chunian road. From Hujra Shah Muqeem 9 km and from Chunian 17 km.These farms were established before the creation of Pakistan in 1947. On the east of District Okara is Kasur district, Sahiwal while on the west are Pakpattan districts, whereas Nankana Sahib and Faisalabad districts on the North and Bahawalnagar district on the South. The total area of district Okara is 4,377 square kilometers and comprises of three tehsils of Okara.

Okara is the largest potato producing district of Pakistan. The share of Okara is 38.44 % and 36.66 % in total potato production of Punjab and Pakistan respectively which shows that Okara is contributing remarkably in aggregate potato production in Punjab and Pakistan. It is a major root crop produced in Ethiopia and it is short duration crop which matured within 3-4 months (Endale et al., 2008). Potato is an important sources of on-farm income for the growers in Ethiopia. It is rapidly becoming a valuable source of cash income due to an increasing demand of food processing sector to meet demand of fast food, snack and food industries (FAO, 2010). It is the most common marketed vegetables of the marketed products (Bezabih and Hadera, 2007).

Population

All the farmers who visited the advisory services from January 1st to 31st March was population of study. The list of visitors was collected from the office and it was found that there were total 175 farmers who were considered as population.

Sample size
There is no firm lead for test estimate (Wimmer and Dominick ; Best and Kahn, 2006). The “idea of research’’ may decide the example measure. The most critical is the method for choice subjects as opposed to the size (Best and Kahn, 2006).

Sample may be defined as the true representative of the universe which has all characteristics of the whole universe. A sample of about 120 farmers was randomly selected to gather information about the underlying research.

The list of last three month (January -March 2020) of visiting farmers was taken from extension office Tehsil Depalpur. The list was recognized according to village wise for contacting with farmers easily. 

Data collection instrument

There are assorted tools or instruments for collection of information or data likewise questionnaire. The statistics series through private interview approach presents opportunity to an investigator to solve out the reliable authentic information due to more elasticity, strength, response price and intensive probing (Denscombe, 2003; Khan, 2007).

The researcher used a well-structured questionnaire for collection of data from the farmers taking advisory services. This questionnaire was prepared with great care and with the consultation of the experts.

Pre – testing

The reason behind pre -testing was to evaluate and discover the workability of the estimating instrument. The other reason for existing was to roll out at any critical and essential improvements in the estimation of instrument before initiation of the real information gathering. The pre-test gave the specialist a chance to discover and take care of any unforeseeable issue that may emerge amid the meetings and furthermore proportional the degree to which the respondents were touchy to specific inquiries.

 

Data collection

 

The data collection started in commencing of month April. The data were collected by researcher himself and it was the tough and hard experience for researcher because the farmers were not ready to response reaching and contacting them in their native area, lack of time for questionnaire and some other social barrier.

Data Analysis

 

Just gathering of crude information is of no utilization. It must be in an adequate shape for deducing a type of conclusions. Information examination is basic for smoothening the method for displaying the information in a justifiable and complete way. The crude information were analyzed through PC program SPSS (Social Packages for Social Sciences). Rates, mean and standard deviations were processed. Weighted scores were additionally acquired.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

Table 1: Distribution of the respondents according to their age

Age of the respondents (in years) f %
Up to 35 42 35.0
>35-45 48 40.0
Above 45 30 25.0
Total 120 100.0

Data presented in Table 1 show that almost one-third (35.0%) of the respondents had up to 35 years of age, while 40.0% of the farmers had >35-45 years and remaining one-fourth (25%) of the respondents had more than 45 years. The results of Muhammad et al. (2014) are partially similar to current study who found that the respondents were ranging from 25-75 years old.

Table 2: Distribution of the respondents according to their education

Education of the respondents Frequency Percentage
Illiterate 32 26.7
Up to Middle 28 23.3
Matric 36 30.0
Above Matric 24 20.0
Total 120 100.0

 

Table 2 indicates that 26.7 percent sampled farmers were illiterate, 23.3 percent of the respondents had up to middle level education while 30 percent of the farmers were matriculated and 20.0 percent farmers had above matric level education. Similarly, the results of Muhammad et al. (2014) also partially coincide with those of present study which represents that one fourth (24.2%) of the respondents got education up to matriculation and above matriculation respectively. More than one fifth (22.5%) were up to middle and 17.5% were upto primary. These results are more or less similar to Munawar (2012) who reported that one forth of the respondents (30.5%) got education up to matric, one fifth (20%) were up to primary level and the same were illiterate. It can be deduced from the above results that most of the respondents were educated which interpreted their interest in plant clinics.

Table 3: Distribution of the respondents according to their size of land holding

Size of land holdings (acres) Frequency Percentage
Small (Up to 6) 39 32.5
Medium (>6-12.5) 43 35.8
Large (Above 12.5) 38 31.7
Total 120 100.0

In Table 3 three End Match  categorizes  End Match of the farmers were made regarding about their land holding size:  Begin Match to source 13 in source list: Submitted to Higher Education Commission Pakistan on 2014-05-02(i) up to 6 acres End Match of land,  Begin Match to source 13 in source list: Submitted to Higher Education Commission Pakistan on 2014-05-02(ii) End Match >6-12.5  Begin Match to source 13 in source list: Submitted to Higher Education Commission Pakistan on 2014-05-02acres End Match  of land,  Begin Match to source 13 in source list: Submitted to Higher Education Commission Pakistan on 2014-05-02and (iii) End Match >12.5  Begin Match to source 13 in source list: Submitted to Higher Education Commission Pakistan on 2014-05-02acres End Match  of land.  Data in Table 3 depicts that about one-third (32.5%) of the respondents were small farmers and had up to 6 acres of land while more than one-third (35.8%) of the respondents were medium farmers and had >6-12.5 acres of land and 31.7 percent of them were large farmers and they had above 12.5 acres of land.The results were more or less similar to those of Muhammad et al. (2008).

Table 4 : Farmers perception about familiarity with plant clinics

Impact of Plant Clinics Yes No Very low Low Medium High Very high
f % f % f % f % f % f % F %
Use quality seeds 70 58.3 50 41.7 4 3.3 3 2.5 7 5.8 22 18.3 34 28.3
Improvement in crop varieties 67 55.8 53 44.2 7 5.8 7 5.8 8 6.7 20 16.7 25 20.8
Holes on potato cob 40 33.3 80 66.7 10 8.3 8 6.7 9 7.5 5 4.2 8 6.7
Broken potato plant tip 44 36.7 76 63.3 7 5.8 11 9.2 11 9.2 8 6.7 7 5.8
Holes on potato plant stem 40 33.3 80 66.7 10 8.3 9 7.5 10 8.3 6 5.0 5 4.2
Agriculture trade fairs 57 47.5 63 52.5 5 4.2 8 6.7 9 7.5 13 10.8 22 18.3
Availability and use of internet 27 22.5 93 77.5 4 3.3 10 8.3 5 4.2 5 4.2 3 2.5
Impact of plant clinic on potato productivity 70 58.3 50 41.7 5 4.2 4 3.3 6 5.0 25 20.8 30 25.0

Majority (58.3 %) of the respondents stated that they used quality seed of potato and 55.8% stated that after the impact of plant clinic on potato productivity they will make improvement in crop varieties. 22.5% of the people have availability and they use of internet. However, weighted score, mean value, standard deviation and ranked order are presented in the above Table.

Table 5: Ranking order of farmers familiar with plant clinics

Familiar about plant clinic W.S. Mean S.D. Rank
Use quality seeds 289 4.13 .64 1
Plant doctorial 281 4.01 .59 2
Improvement in crop varieties 250 3.73 .87 3
Agriculture trade fairs 210 3.68 .98 4
Broken potato plant tip 129 2.93 1.07 5
Holes on potato 113 2.83 1.03 6
Availability and use of internet 74 2.74 1.06 7
Holes on potato plant stem 107 2.68 1.11 8

Scale: 1 = Very Low, 2 = Low, 3 = Medium, 4 = High, 5 = Very high

 

The Table 5 represents the ranking order of level of farmers’ perception about familiar with plant clinics. Farmers using of quality seed (4.13±.64) and plant doctoral (4.01±.59) were ranked as first and second respectively and these mean values are fell in between the high and very high categories but were more inclined toward high category. However, Improvement in crop varieties (3.73±.87) and agriculture trade fairs (3.68±.98) were ranked as 3rd to 4th, respectively. These mean value show that farmers responses fell in between the medium and high categories but were more inclined toward high category. Furthermore, broken potato plant tip (2.93±1.07), holes on potato (2.83±1.03), availability and use of internet (2.74±1.06) and holes on potato plant stem (2.68±1.11) were ranked as 5th to 8th, respectively and mean values fell in between the low and medium categories but were more inclined toward medium category. 

CONCLUSIONS

It can be concluded that most of respondents were under middle age, live in rural area, have basic schooling education, small land holding. It may also be concluded that majority of the farmers stated that they used quality seed of potato and 55.8% stated that after the impact of plant clinic on potato productivity they will make improvement in crop varieties. Majority of frmers were were aware with the impact of plant clinic on potato productivity as they were getting awareness about seed, varieties, use of internet and productivity related other aspects.

REFERENCES

Best, J.W. and J.V. Kahn. 2006. Research in Education. Prentice- Hall of India private Limited, New Delhi, India. Bradshaw,

Bezabih, E. and G. Hadera. 2007. Constraints and opportunities of horticulture production and marketing in eastern Ethiopia. Dry Lands Coordination Group Report. Norway. : 46-90.

Endale, G., W. Gebremedhin and L. Berga. 2008. Potato Seed Management. In Root and tuber crops: Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The untapped resources, ed. W. Gebremedhin, G. Endale, and B. Lemaga.: 53-78.

FAO. 2010. Strengthening Potato Value Chains, Technical and Policy options for Developing Countries. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the Common Fun for Commodities. Rome, Italy

Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). 2012. Food and Agricultural commodities production.

Govt. of Pakistan. 2010. Economic survey of Pakistan. Economic advisor wing, finance division, Islamabad.

Govt. of Pakistan.2017. Economic survey of Pakistan. Ministry of Economic Affairs. Government of Pakistan, Islamabad, Pakistan.

Khatam, A. 2011. Analysis of farmers’ field schools as an alternative extension strategy to benefit resource poor farmers from existing agricultural technologies in the central region of NWFP, Pakistan. PhD dissertation. Department of agri. Ext., Division of Edu. and Ext. Univ. of Agric. Faisalabad.

Khurshid, 2015.Role of Agricultural Extension Agents in Transfer of Onion production Technology in District Swat, Agricultural extension education and communication, the University of Agriculture, Peshawar.

MOE. 2009. Climate Change Vulnerabilities in Agriculture in Pakistan. Ministry of Environment, Govt. of Pakistan, Annual Report: 1-6.

Muhammad, S., S.A. Butt and I. Ashraf. 2014. Role of television in agricultural technology transfer. Pak. J Agri. Sci. 41: 158-161.

Muhammad, S., T.E. Lodhi, and G.A. Khan, 2008. An in-depth analysis of the electronic media for the development of a strategy to enhance their role in agricultural technology transfer in the Punjab, Pakistan. Final Report of Research Project submitted to Higher Education Commission, Islamabad.

Munawar, M. 2012. Action Research Concerning Women Empowerment in Union Council No. 133, Faisalabad. M.Sc. (Hons) Thesis, Institute of Agri. Extension and Rural Development Univ. of Agri., FSD.

Plant wise Annual Report. 2016. Knowledge for people life. Available at https://site.plantwise.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/2019/03/Plantwise-Annual-Report-2016.pdf

Saima, S., S. Muhammad and T.E. Lodhi. 2005. Need for Agricultural Extension Services for Rural Women in Tehsil Faisalabad, Pakistan. Pak. J. Agri. Soc. Sci. 1: 248-51.

Cite this Article: Asif, W; Hameed, MU; Majeed, MH; Abdin, ZU; Usama, M; Raza, HA (2021). Perception of potato growers regarding plant clinic in Okara District, Punjab, Pakistan. Greener Journal of Agricultural Sciences 11(4): 222-227.

 

PDF VIEWER

Loader Loading...
EAD Logo Taking too long?

Reload Reload document
| Open Open in new tab

Download

 2,169 total views,  1 views today

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.